Last Chance to Nominate a Summer Superhero

September 20, 2017

Do you know a Superintendent who has demonstrated extraordinary support for summer learning programs during the time between September 2016-September 2017? Can you help us find and celebrate this superhero? Summer Matters is looking for nominations for our Superhero award, given each year to California Superintendents who make summer learning matter in their districts.

“When superintendents step up and make summer learning a priority and invest in it, we see other progress at school sites and other partners, and in some cases, cities coming to the table as well,” said Jennifer Peck, the co-chair of the California Summer Matters campaign and the President and CEO of the Partnership for Children & Youth.

Past honorees have included Superintendents from Marin, Pomona, and Gilroy. Add your district to the list of Summer Matters Superheroes, and nominate your Superintendent today!

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